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Grant Nursing Information Session

December 5, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Dec. 5, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

A nursing session to learn how to become better educated and informed is going to be taking place on the Grant Campus.  If you are interested in nursing then come on down and check it out.  It takes place on Wednesday, Dec. 7, right before the end of the fall semester.

The college is holding the clinic at the Grant Campus in Brentwood.  Students in the program can come down to the Sagtikos Upper Mezzanine area to check out the session.  This is at 10AM – 11:30AM.

These sessions are for the Grant Campus Nursing Program only. They will give information & answer questions concerning admission procedures and requirements. Sessions will start on time and run approximately an hour and a half.

For more information and if you are interested, please register in the Grant Campus Admissions Office or call (631) 851-6719 for any details.

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Posted in Events

The Women’s Tennis team makes it to Nationals, and plays where the US Open was played

December 5, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Dec. 5, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

This year the National Junior College Athletic Association, (NJCAA) Division III Women’s Tennis National Championship was at Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. on Wed. Oct. 26 to Fri. Oct. 28 where the United States Tennis Association is located.

Before the championship the NJCAA made a statement to the girls tennis team.  “Congratulations on your success! But don’t let it end here,” said Mary Ellen Leicht, Executive Director of the NJCAA.  “Continue to use the same tools that got you to this point to lead you even further.”

The college tennis team made it to nationals, and this year the championship was held where the US Open plays.  Before the event, the Tournament Committee wished the players a lot success in this past season. All teams that were involved in the tournament were required to stay at the LaGuardia Plaza Hotel. Each school was responsible for their transportation and costs while attending the Championship. The hotel is 10 minutes to the National Tennis Center. The entry fee for the players is $60 per player and per event is $720 for a team.

For The College to make it to nationals was an exiting occasion.  Their schedule was a four day event. The first day was where the coaches met at the hotel at 1PM and by 6:30PM the team was invited to a championship banquet before the first day of play.

“We are proud to host this year’s event and hope everyone will enjoy their visit to New York,” said the president of The College, Shawn McKay.  “I wish the best of luck to all the participating teams and individual competitions who have trained so hard to reach this very special day.”

The College’s Head Coach, Department Chair of Physical Education, and college courses  Chris Cosenza has coached the men’s tennis team at the college since 2004 and the women’s team since 2006 making it a total of seven years.  As the women’s tennis coach for five years now he was thrilled and proud of what they accomplished.

“We definitely went up agents some tough competition, which we expected, we qualified for the tournament but didn’t win our reign this year, so we knew it was going to be difficult, I knew that going in, but it was really a matter of just the experience for the players. Some of them are first years, so I know I’ll have a lot of them next year, and I hope to do better next season,” said Cosenza.

There was a mandatory meeting for all Head Coaches before the plays took place.  Coaches were able to reserve courts at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center for the cost of $20 per court.  The next day at 9AM the players began to play. An athletic trainer was on site each day from 9AM to 5PM. The college team is made up of six girls, Elena Ferrara, Frances Vilk, Kerri Cetin, Miranda kass, Sabrina Giaquinto, and Seneca Cornelius.

“This is the third time I’ve made it to nationals of the women’s team, in the past it’s actually been held in Arizona, in the spring, which was a little bit unusual because our seasons in the fall.  So we’d have our fall season, we’d qualify for nationals, and then we’d have to wait till May in order to go play our national tournament.  The problem with that was that there’d be students who would graduate in December and wouldn’t be around in the spring.  There’s students who academically were not eligible, there were eligible to play during our main season who would have some academic issues during the fall semester and come spring time weren’t eligible to compete so they weren’t able to go with us.  This was the first year they had the national tournament during the same season we competed in, which worked out terrific in that sense,” said Cosenza.

“I’m proud the girls tennis team made it to nationals, its awesome they got to play where the US Open is,” said 24 year old Alex Wilhelm a student at the college.  “I watch it on TV and always wanted to go, they must feel great that they got the opportunity to go.”

“I’ve been there [Meadow Lands at the National Tennis Center] a number of times, I’ve played there before, I’ve been there as a spectator for the US Open, but for a lot of these players it was there first experience there, they’ve only seen it on television, so I think it was really a terrific experience for them,” said Cosenza.

At the end of the Championships, the Awards Ceremony will took place on the grounds of the National Tennis Center.  Even though the college didn’t win, it was still a moment they won’t soon forget playing where the US Open is held.


Posted in Sports

Grant-FREE Smoking Cessation Clinic-Learn To Be Tobacco Free

November 22, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Nov. 22, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

A free smoking clinic to learn how to become tobacco free is going to be taking place on the Grant Campus. If you are a smoker and are trying to quit then head on down, because this is the place to be. It takes place on Wednesday, Nov. 23, right before the Thanksgiving break, so give thanks to your health this holiday season.

The college is holding the clinic at the Grant Campus in Brentwood. Students can come down to the HSAEC A room 222 and/ or 223 to check out the clinic. This is at 11AM – 12:20PM.

This is a 6-week program starting in the fall 2011. This event is coordinated with the Suffolk County Department of health Services. ?Nicotine replacement products will be available if medically qualified. Students, faculty, staff and the general public are welcome.

For more information or to enroll in the program, contact Health Services, Captree Commons in room 105 or call (631)-851-6709 for any details.


Posted in Uncategorized

An award given to very few, Professor Quinones is honored with The Inspired Comfort Award

November 22, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Nov. 22, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

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Professor Lisa Quinones Winning The Inspired Comfort Award

A Professor of Nursing at the College, Lisa Quinones, received the Inspired Comfort Award presented by Cherokee Uniforms.

Professor Lisa Quinones Winning The Inspired Comfort Award

She was honored with the award for her global and local efforts to educate students, health advocates, and underserved populations in Latin America.

Through the years, Quinones received a Bachelor of Science degree at State University of New York: Downstate Medical Center and a Masters degree at State University of New York at Stony Brook. She also has a Nurse Practitioner Certification in OB/GYN and Adult Primary Care.

You can now find her at the Riverhead technology building room 343.

The Inspired Comfort Award is recognized at the national level for exceptional skills, characteristics and work of nurses and other non-physician healthcare professionals who provide outstanding service, sacrifice, and innovation while  impacting others’ lives which is decided by Cherokee Uniforms.

“Lisa was nominated for this award for her extraordinary ability and passionate commitment to mentor and teach both future nurses and health-promotion advocates in Latin America whose knowledge and communication directly impacts the health of impoverished, rural communities. No audience is too prestigious or too humble for her to share her knowledge, expertise and perspective with whether it’s a UN conference, officials from the Vatican, or those who help women in Latin America deliver their babies,” said Wendell Mobley who directs Cherokee Uniforms’ charitable and scholarship programs.

“Lisa embodies the spirit of the Inspired Comfort Award.” “Lisa teaches by doing,” explains Dr. Frances LaFauci, Associate Dean of Nursing at SCCC and Quinones’ nominator. “The four walls of a classroom could never contain the endless compassion and the knowledge she has to offer to this world, and that’s proven by the work we do and the lives we touch under her leadership.”

Professor Lisa Quinones, who is a highly skilled nurse practitioner, RNC MS OGNP ANP ICCE, Professor of Nursing at the college spends vacations going across the borders and traveling the world to help others. She has skills in first aid, infant delivery, and managing slight health issues. Quinones led medical missions to areas of Panama, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic, which call for special and prolonged efforts to help others in need.

Quinones presented her research to the United Nations’ World Youth Alliance and addressed issues in Honduras in 2010. She is a volunteer member for the nonprofit group Hope for a Healthier Humanity (HHH). Professor Quinones has taken groups of her nursing students on the trips, which require 14-hour days.

On Ratemyprofessor.com, a student wrote, “Great, informative, helpful, and loves her job! Better yet, loves helping students!!”

“If I could change one thing about the world, it would be that healthcare is a human right, not a luxury,” said Quinones.

Quinones is driven by her belief that healthcare must be accessible to all humans across the globe. Since The Inspired Comfort Award was established in 2003, almost 9,900 healthcare professionals have been nominated across the various nursing and non-physician disciplines. The individual’s who evaluates the nominations and grants the awards is a panel of Cherokee representatives and other Inspired Comfort Award winners. Professor Quinones was one of just seven recipients nationwide who has received this prestigious award.

“Famines continue all over the world, mothers and babies die every day due to lack of accessible care, and health education is available only to those who are aware of the resources available. There is a great nursing shortage here and abroad, but as nurses we must never forget our oath to care across all cultures and circumstances without prejudice,” said Quinones. “The greatest degree of inner tranquility comes from the development of love and compassion. The more we care for the happiness of others, the greater is our sense of well-being.”


Posted in Feature

The Smurfs Movie

November 14, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Oct. 30, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

The Smurfs is going to be playing at the college.  It’s a great time for parents to take your children to see it on  Friday, Nov. 11.

The college is playing the movie at the Ammerman Campus in Selden.  Students can come down to the Islip Arts Building room 115 to check out the Smurfs.  This is at 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM.

Free family movie night! Bring the whole family to see, Smurfs, rated PG. Enjoy the furry little blue creatures and some free popcorn. A non-perishable food item would be appreciated.

Admission is free. The Smurfs is a CG animated and live action feature movie about the nostalgic little blue cartoon characters. Young children will think this movie is super smurfy. Contains some rude humor, a few suggestive jokes and lots of smurf language. The Smurfs movie is a been-there-done-that cross between Alvin and the Chipmunks and Enchanted.  For more information contact campus activities at (631) 451-4376.


Posted in Events

Friday Family Fun Flicks

November 14, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Oct. 30, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

Friday Family Fun Flicks is going to be playing a movie at the college. The college is having Campus Activities and Early Childhood play the movie “Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows: Part 2″ at the Eastern Campus in Riverhead.

It’s a great time be with friends and family to get caught up again in all the magic or see the final movie for the first time on Friday, Nov. 11.  Students can come down to the Shinnecock room 101 to check out the movie.  This is at 7:00 PM. Now that the grand finale is out, “Deathly Hallows: Part 2″ has made itself a fan favorite.

After 10 years Harry Potter is a classic American family favorite.  “Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows: Part 2″ is sending the beloved series out with a bang. Reviews have said this is the movie as being best “Harry Potter” installment.

Bring the whole family to see, the last Harry Potter, rated PG 13. So join Campus Activities and Early Childhood for the movie “Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows: Part 2.”  For more information student can come down to Campus Activities, Peconic Building room 119 or call (631) 548-2522.


Posted in Events

Vending Machines dOVER Priced Following 33 Percent Increase

November 14, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Oct. 30, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

Vending machine prices have increased by as much as 33 percent since last semester according to a recent Ammerman campus survey.

Islip Arts Building

“There’s an increase in price, because there’s an increase in goods,” said Nick Skelos, manager of Dover Hospitality Services, Inc.

A license agreement between Dover Hospitality Services and the college indicates that Dover is responsible for the cafeterias on the Ammerman and the Grant campus. Along with the cafeterias Dover also services the vending machines in buildings across the campuses.

Skelos further explained the vending machine increase in an interview on Oct. 24.

“Our costs have increased dramatically in the last couple of years due to the fact that there’s an increase in goods. Trucking is more expensive. Gas prices are hot. It starts with the gas prices. Gas prices are high, and it goes from there,” Skelos said.

Vending machines are available in most Ammerman Campus buildings. The only building without vending machines is the Huntington Library. The Riverhead building and the Babylon Student Center, both have two vending locations.

Last semester the NFL College Administration building located by the east entrance of the campus was cited for having a reduced cost for vending items. Items in the machines were as much as 50 cents cheaper. This semester the price of items of the vending machines are up 50 cents more that last semester. From $1.50 to $2.00 in drinks, making it a 33 percent difference in costs.

Dover pays $270,000 in capital improvements, with annual payments of $25,000 to the College. On top of this money, the College takes commissions between 11 percent and 12.5 percent from the gross of sales of food services. They take 28 percent on vending machines sales from all the vending machines. The College and Dover determine snack and drink prices for the machines. The College has to approve the price increase by Dover.

While Skelos claimed that he did not know the percentage of profit that Dover earns for vending services, the College’s contract with Dover is clear about the profits.

Dover’s been affiliated with The College for five years. The College is licensed to continue working with Dover Food Services for another six years; as of July 1, 2010 the contract has been extended to another five years, expiring on June 30, 2015. The College receives proceeds from Dover’s sales due to commissions.

Throughout the course of each day, two maintenance workers service the vending machines five days a week. The buildings with vending areas have two machines, one for drinks and one for snacks. Dover does offer refunds, with the number on the machine. The number to call is (516) 933-4444 extension 13.

The drinks available are Coke A Cola, Dasani water, Nestea Cool Lemon Iced Tea, Diet Coke, and Sprite, which all increased 50 cents from the previous semester. The snacks such as chips and candy range from $1.00 to a $1.50. As for the gaming room, the machine carries cans of soda at a cheaper price making it $1.25.  The water and some snacks such as chips and pop tarts have a difference in price from the cafeteria and the vending machines. In the cafeteria, the water is cheaper than the water in the vending machines. Pop tarts are the opposite; they’re $1.50 in the cafeteria and $1.25 in the vending machines.

When asked why the water prices were different, Skelos said, “All the machines have to be fixed; all the drinks are one price in the machines, so water and soda they all have to be fixed that way, where as in here [the cafeteria] we can actually distinguish between one drink and another. You’re never going to go to a vending machine and see two, three different prices.”

If the snacks are two different prices, in the machines, then why isn’t the water and soda that way as well?

“Snacks cost different prices, and the machines are different, two separate machines” [from the drinks and snacks], Skelos said.

“Vending machines have to be programmed separately. It’s, its own separate department, that’s why there’s a difference in price of water from the vending machines and the cafeteria,” Andre Greenfield a third year manager said.

In a random survey on the Ammerman campus students reported spending around $10 each week and some said as much as $5 a day on vending items.

“I don’t like the idea the price of the vending machines went up in price. We pay enough to go here, at least make the snacks and drinks cheap,” said Mike Ellison an Ammerman campus sophomore. He mentioned, now that he knows the price went up; he won’t come back as much.


Posted in News

Autumn Run

November 14, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Oct. 11, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

The college Theatre Training Program presents a new play called, “Autumn Run” by Susan Bigelow and by guest director Janice L. Goldberg on Oct. 12, through the 23.

Autumn Run

The Theatre Training Program is holding the play on the Ammerman Campus in Selden.  Students can come down to the Shea Theatre to check out the world premier of Autumn Run.  This is at 8:00 p.m. on Oct. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, and 22 and on Oct. 16 and 23 at 2:00 p.m.

The preview to what the play is about say that, “Autumn is the time of year in the Pacific Northwest when salmon swim upstream to spawn and die. The time of year that four brothers revisit the riverbank cabin of their youth to confront the realities and non-realities of a summer ten years past.”

Admission to the play for the general public is $12.00.  Any student with a valid ID is $11.00 and students who attend Suffolk are entitled to one free ticket with a valid college ID shown.  Faculty, staff, senior citizens, and children, tickets are $11.00.  Suffolk Alumni Association members with an alumni card are to $11.00.

For any student, faculty and stuff member who wants to know more about the play Autumn Run can contact the theatre box office at this number (631) 451 4163, or stop on by room 119 in the Islip Arts Building.  To find out any more information and to get your free tickets and other details can visit http://www.sunysuffolk.edu/spotlight.


Posted in Events

Constitution Day, a strong stand to protect and expand Civil liberties

November 14, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Oct. 11, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

The college held a lecture and discussion on Immigrants and the U.S. Constitution on the Ammerman Campus in the Montauk Point room in the Babylon Student Center on Sept. 22.

Constitution Day- Guest Speaker Amol Sinha

Constitution Day- Guest Speaker Amol Sinha

Students on campus came to learn more about the Constitution. The college also had the lecture on the Grant and Eastern Campuses as well to talk about these issues.

The college had a guest speaker come in to speak with everyone on each campus; Amol Sinha, the director of the Suffolk Chapter of the New York Civil Liberties Union. The Suffolk Center on the Holocaust, Diversity and Human Understanding has partnered with the Offices of Campus Activities in hosting this year’s Constitution day seminar.

Amol Sinha was born in Philadelphia and raised in New Jersey; Amol earned a B.A. in Journalism and economics from New York University and a law degree from the Benjamin N. Cardoza school of Law, where he focused on constitutional rights and litigation. During college he worked at various non-profit organizations including the international AIDS vaccine initiative. He also taught Journalism to inner city high school students. Before the event he made a statement about what he hopes to expect.

“I’m looking forward to taking a strong stand to protect and expand civil liberties and rights here in Suffolk County.” Amol Sinha said.

“I’m proud to be serving such a vibrant community and look forward to working with our members to fight for justice and fairness.” Said Sinha.

Constitution day has been going on for several years in which campus activities are responsible for annually offering a constitution day program which are part of a congressional mandate, which colleges have to do. For several years Professor Barbara Ripel from the history department ran the Constitution day program.

Last year Constitution day did a program on the new Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and had a panel discussion on the impact that she has had on the Latino community. This year they offered to campus activities that the Suffolk Center on the Holocaust, Diversity, and Human Understanding would conduct the program.

“We have a special interest in doing programming that helps promote better understanding of cultural differences in general and helping to promote values that embrace a human dignity. So we thought this was a great way to bring those issues together here and at the same time studding the constitution and civil liberties and human rights in bringing that together in how immigrants are being treated in this country.” Said Steven Schrier, Professor of Business Law and Political Science at Suffolk.

30 to 40 people attended the Constitution day program, which lasted approximately an hour to an hour and a half long. Steven Schrier, who took his class to the assembly. He also introduced Amol Sinha, who spoke about the Constitution and immigrants.

“I want to learn more about the Constitution and be better informed,” said Pola Griego, Assistant Professor for Sociology at the college.

The focus of Mr. Sinha’s talk was on how constitutional liberties have faired subsequent to 9/11, and that 9/11 was being felt as such a defining moment of people’s concern, about national security in what actions to take, and how there may have been some compromises made in order to provide for security in which people have been deprived of their liberties.

“Amol has been familiar with these kinds of issues and he could bring his view point to it and stimulate some kind of thought and discussion among others and around the college community,” said Schrier.

He talked about the 9/11 after-effect, the negativity and somewhat hatred toward Muslims after 9/11, a branded stereotype that lies upon them. During the 9/11 attacks, constitutional right did not apply. He also talked about the post-9/11 world where in certain states Sharia Law, which many Muslims practice, was banned.

He talked about how some people got caught up as suspects and have had liberties taken from them, and from Amol’s prospective is a problem that needs to be focused on. Amol also brought up Long Island and how police were racially profiling Muslims and looking for them. After speaking he opened up the floor to a (Q&A) question and answer. He told a student if you see something make sure you’re local legislator knows about it.

“I felt it was important and I enjoyed it,” said third semester student, Kimberly Romano, who was there for a history class.

“We shouldn’t take these assumptions for granted and to sacrifice liberty; we should hold representatives and law enforcement accountable,” said Sinha.

“I think he’s a very dedicated, passionate spokesperson for protecting civil liberties and I think he understands the security concerns but doesn’t want to see us compromise that because this is a nation about protecting these fundamental liberties and that we shouldn’t give them up in the face of these kinds of threats,” Professor Schrier said.


Posted in News

Hurricane Irene’s Aftermath Leaves Clean-up Crews Busy

November 10, 2011
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Originally on Campusreporter.wordpress.com on Sept. 26, 2011.

By Taylor Baker

Clean up crews worked about 400 hours on the Ammerman campus removing fallen trees and branches.

 

As of Sunday Aug. 28 Long Island braced for Hurricane Irene and so did The College. This was one of the worst Hurricanes the East Coast had seen in a while. After the storm cleanup efforts were underway.

“I called a meeting of the College’s emergency response team to discuss the College’s preparation for this storm. Topic areas we discussed included communications, staffing in the areas of public safety and plant operations in the event of a loss of utilities. Please be assured that the College will base its decisions during this period on what it considers to be in the best interest of protecting the safety of our students, faculty and staff,” said  College President Dr. Shaun L. McKay in a brief dissemenated through the College email system.

Two days later on Aug. 27 McKay sent another email.

“As Hurricane Irene has continued its track northward, and the College has been closely monitoring the storm’s progress… I have made the decision to cancel the first day of classes on Monday, Aug. 29. I believe cancelling classes on Monday will enable our plant operations staff to clean up our campuses following the storm and will also provide our students and staff with the increased ability to reach our campuses safely when classes resume,” he said.

Irene hit Sunday, Aug. 28, causing high winds, fallen trees, and damage to structures, and a lot of power outages. The College physical plant and maintenance crews  with the assistance of an outside tree removal company did the clean up for the Ammerman Campus.

“We were very fortunate no damage [was] done to any of the buildings. Just a number of trees fell–eight large trees and numerous branches and leaves,” said Ammerman Campus Plant Operations Director Ed Benz . “We had one tree fall on the NFL Building with minimal damage, ” he said.

Eight staff members were on the Ammerman campus on Sunday and Monday with a sufficient amount of vehicles, which was a full staff. Nine staff member stayed for overtime as the clean up continued into Tuesday and Wednesday. The crews spent approximately 400 hours on clean up all together.

The crews didn’t have to wait for LIPA to fix the lines before working on any trees because as  Benz said, “The Ammerman Campus never lost power. We were very fortunate. Again, most of the trees fell on the roadways or in areas where no damage occurred.”

With power outages on the minds of students, they were pleased with the school’s response to the storm’s clean up, as well as the fact that they had no classes on that Monday.

“I was very happy with how the school acted. It would have been difficult for people to park on Tuesday with tree limbs in parking spots; it’s hard enough trying to get a spot in the first place. I was also happy to hear they closed the school Monday,” said Doug Baum who is in his fourth semester at the College.

In a later email on Monday Aug. 29 McKay stated Long Island had a date with Irene. What a way to begin the semester, with cancelled classes… that was the absolutely correct decision. The brief mentioned that McKay extended the College’s thanks to the men and women from various College departments who worked all weekend to keep the college up and running.


Posted in News
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